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Level 0

Prof Samar Aoun pic

Samar Aoun

Perron Institute Research Chair in Palliative Care at the University of Western Australia and Perron Institute for Neurological and Translational Science.

Prof. Aoun is an international leader in the promotion and advocacy of public health approaches to palliative care and led this approach for those living with grief and bereavement. She is known as an innovator and a champion of practice and policy translation of public health science for palliative care. Her work on social models in bereavement support has provided empirical evidence to strengthen the Compassionate Communities approach. Samar advocates for a person-centred health and social care. Her research programs on supporting family carers at end of life and the public health approach to bereavement care have informed policy and practice at the national and international levels.

She co-founded and chairs the South West Compassionate Communities Network in Western Australia (WA) and has led the Compassionate Connector Program which offers the practical and social support needed by families with life limiting illnesses. The program significantly improved social connectedness and reduced hospital admissions. She currently chairs Compassionate Communities Australia.

She is a member of Public Health Palliative Care International and the Public Health Palliative Care reference group of the European Association of Palliative Care. She served as member of the International Expert Advisory Group for the development of best practice statements in bereavement care in palliative care in Europe. She is a past president of the MND Association in WA and MND Australia.

Among her awards: the Centenary Medal in 2003 from the Prime Minister of Australia; the 2018 Medal for Excellence from the European Society for Person Centred Healthcare and more recently the 2023 WA Australian of the year.


Dominic Campbell

Dominic Campbell

Dominic Campbell is a cultural producer interested in the effects of creativity on society. He specializes in the use of celebration as strategy for transformation. He has led Irish Hospice Foundation's Arts and Cultural Engagement programme since its formation during the pandemic. He was formerly Director of Age & Opportunity’s Bealtaine Festival, Ireland’s groundbreaking celebration of creativity in older age, and of Ireland's St Patrick’s Festival. Dominic is a Fellow of the Global Brain Health Institute for whom he is developing Creative Brain Week connecting neuroscientists and artists to address “wicked and sticky" social and health problems. He is an Atlantic Fellow, and Co-founder of Creative Aging International. He is a contributor to the Jameel Arts and Health Lab collaboration with 50 leading researchers producing five Lancet Global specials on the role of arts to reduce the impact of non-communicable diseases due in 2025.


Level 1


Neil Thompson 3

Neil Thompson

 

Dr Neil Thompson is an independent writer, developer of online learning resources and a visiting professor at the Open University in the UK. He has published extensively on death, grief and bereavement and is a longstanding member of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement. His website, with his acclaimed Manifesto for Making a Difference, is at www.NeilThompson.info.


 Level 2


Photo Danai Papadatou

Danai Papadatou

 

Prof. Danai Papadatou is an Emeritus Professor of Clinical Psychology, at the National and Kapodistrian University in Athens. Her clinical experience, research interests, and publications focus on issues related to pediatric palliative care, childhood and family bereavement, community trauma, and the impact of caring for dying and bereaved people upon professionals. She is also the founder and chair of the Board of “Merimna”, a non-governmental association for the care of children and families who encounter illness and death which provides pediatric palliative home care services and bereavement support for children, adolescents, families, schools and communities in Greece. Since 2016, she has been involved in the training and supervision of field workers who support unaccompanied refugee minors and has been conducting extensive research in this field. She has received several international awards for her teaching, research, publications and community service in palliative care, death education, and childhood bereavement support, and has been currently appointed Chair of the National Committee for the development of Palliative Care in Greece. She is a member of several international organizations, among them the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement, and has served as chair and member of its Board of Directors.


 

Emily Harrop

Emily Harrop

 

Dr Emily Harrop is a palliative care researcher at the Marie Curie Research Centre, Cardiff University. Her research interests are; grief and bereavement; the support needs of family caregivers; experiences of living with advanced illness and inequities and inequalities in palliative/bereavement care provision and outcomes. She recently co-led a large UK wide study investigating bereavement experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic and is a co-investigator/work-package lead in the new NIHR funded ‘Equitable Bereavement Care for All (EBCA)’ study, led by colleagues at Kings College London and Sheffield University. Emily is also Editor in Chief of Bereavement: Journal of Grief and Responses to Death.